Getting The Right Treatment

These days there are lots of choices within the NHS.  Make the right choice, at the right time and you will get the best possible treatment. We know it can sometimes be difficult to decide what kind of help you need when you or your family have a health problem and we hope this page helps to explain all the options available to you. Most of the advice is also included in NHS Choices, an NHS website which contains a lot of useful information about many conditions.

Cough

A cough will usually go away within 3 weeks on its own.

How you can treat a cough yourself

Most coughs go away on their own within 3 weeks. There's usually no need to see a GP.

You should:

  • rest
  • drink plenty of fluids
  • drink hot lemon with honey (not suitable for babies)

Hot lemon with honey has a similar effect as cough medicines.

How to make hot lemon with honey at home

Speak to your pharmacist if you have a cough. They can give you advice or suggest treatments to help you cough less, like cough syrups and lozenges. These won’t get rid of the cough. Some cough medicines shouldn’t be given to children under 12.

See a GP if:

  • you've had a cough for more than 3 weeks (persistent cough)
  • your cough is very bad or quickly gets worse, for example – you have a hacking cough or can't stop coughing
  • you have chest pain
  • you're losing weight for no reason
  • the side of your neck feels swollen and painful (swollen glands)
  • you find it hard to breathe
  • you have a weakened immune system, for example because of chemotherapy or diabetes

See a GP urgently if you're coughing up blood.

To find out what's causing your cough your GP might:

  • take a sample of any mucus you might be coughing up
  • order an X-ray, allergy test, or test to see how well your lungs work
  • refer you to hospital to see a specialist, but this is very rare

Most coughs are caused by cold or flu. Other causes include:

  • smoking
  • heartburn (acid reflux)
  • allergies – for example, hay fever
  • infections like bronchitis
  • mucus dripping down the throat from the back of the nose

A cough is very rarely a sign of something serious like lung cancer

Colds

You can often treat a cold without seeing your GP. You should begin to feel better in about a week or two.

Cold symptoms come on gradually and can include:

  • blocked or runny nose
  • sore throat
  • headaches
  • muscle aches
  • coughs
  • sneezing
  • a raised temperature
  • pressure in your ears and face
  • loss of taste and smell

The symptoms are the same in adults and children. Sometimes, symptoms last longer in children.

Telling the difference between cold and flu

Cold and flu symptoms are similar but flu tends to be more severe.

Cold

Flu

Appears gradually

Appears quickly within a few hours

Affects mainly your nose and throat

Affects more than just your nose and throat

Makes you feel unwell but you’re okay to carry on as normal – for example, go to work

Makes you feel exhausted and too unwell to carry on as normal

To help you get better more quickly:

  • rest and sleep
  • keep warm
  • drink plenty of water (fruit juice or squash mixed with water is ok) to avoid dehydration
  • gargle salt water to soothe a sore throat

You can buy cough and cold medicines from pharmacies or supermarkets. A pharmacist can advise you on the best medicine.

You can:

  • relieve a blocked nose with decongestant sprays or tablets
  • ease aches or lower a temperature with painkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen

Be careful not to use cough and cold medicines if you’re taking paracetamol and ibuprofen tablets as it’s easy to take more than the recommended dose.

Some are not suitable for children, babies and pregnant women.

There’s little evidence that supplements (such as vitamin c, zinc, echinacea or garlic) prevent colds or speed up recovery.

See a GP if:

  • your symptoms don't improve after three weeks
  • your symptoms get suddenly worse
  • your temperature is very high or you feel hot and shivery
  • you're concerned about your child's symptoms
  • you're finding it hard to breathe or develop chest pain
  • you have a long-term medical condition – for example, diabetes, or a heart, lung, kidney or neurological disease
  • you have a weakened immune system – for example, because you're having chemotherapy

Antibiotics

GPs don't recommend antibiotics for colds because they won't relieve your symptoms or speed up your recovery.

Antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections and colds are caused by viruses.

How to avoid spreading a cold

Colds are caused by viruses and easily spread to other people. You're infectious until all your symptoms have gone. This usually takes a week or two.

Colds are spread by germs from coughs and sneezes which can live on hands and surfaces for 24 hours.

To reduce the risk of spreading a cold:

  • wash your hands often with warm water and soap
  • use tissues to trap germs when you cough or sneeze
  • bin used tissues as quickly as possible

How to prevent catching a cold

A person with a cold can start spreading it from a few days before their symptoms begin until the symptoms have finished. The best ways to avoid catching a cold are:

  • washing your hands with warm water and soap
  • not sharing towels or household items (like cups) with someone who has a cold
  • not touching your eyes or nose in case you've come into contact with the virus – it can infect the body this way
  • staying fit and healthy

The flu vaccine helps prevent the flu but not colds

Cystitis is inflammation of the bladder, usually caused by a bladder infection. It's a common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly in women, and is usually more of a nuisance than a cause for serious concern. Mild cases will often get better by themselves within a few days. However, some people experience episodes of cystitis frequently and may need regular or long-term treatment.

There's also a chance that cystitis could lead to a more serious kidney infection in some cases, so it's important to seek medical advice if your symptoms don't improve.

The main symptoms of cystitis include:

  • pain, burning or stinging when you pee
  • needing to pee more often and urgently than normal
  • urine that's dark, cloudy or strong smelling
  • pain low down in your tummy
  • feeling generally unwell, achy, sick and tired

Possible symptoms in young children include a high temperature (fever) of 38C (100.4F) or above, weakness, irritability, reduced appetite and vomiting.

When to see your GP

Women don't necessarily need to see their GP if they have cystitis, as mild cases often get better without treatment. You can try the self-help measures listed below, or ask your pharmacist for advice.

See your GP if:

  • you're not sure whether you have cystitis
  • your symptoms don't start to improve within a few days
  • you get cystitis frequently
  • you have severe symptoms, such as blood in your urine, a fever or pain in your side
  • you're pregnant and have symptoms of cystitis
  • you're a man and have symptoms of cystitis
  • your child has symptoms of cystitis

Your GP should be able to diagnose cystitis by asking about your symptoms. They may test a sample of your urine for bacteria to help confirm the diagnosis.

What causes cystitis?

Most cases are thought to occur when bacteria that live harmlessly in the bowel or on the skin get into the bladder through the urethra (tube that carries urine out of your body).

It's not always clear how this happens, but it can be caused by:

  • having sex
  • wiping your bottom after going to the toilet – particularly if you wipe from back to front
  • inserting a tampon or urinary catheter (a thin tube inserted into the urethra to drain the bladder)
  • using a diaphragm for contraception

Women may get cystitis more often than men because their anus (back passage) is closer to their urethra, and their urethra is much shorter, which means bacteria may be able to get into the bladder more easily.

Read more about the causes of cystitis.

Treatments for cystitis

If you see your GP with cystitis, you'll usually be prescribed antibiotics to treat the infection. These should start to have an effect within a day or two.

If you've had cystitis before and don't feel you need to see your GP, you may want to treat your symptoms at home.

Until you're feeling better, it may help to:

  • take paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • drink plenty of water
  • hold a hot water bottle on your tummy or between your thighs
  • avoid having sex

Some people find it helpful to try over-the-counter products that reduce the acidity of their urine (such as sodium bicarbonate or potassium citrate), but there's a lack of evidence to suggest they're effective.

If you keep getting cystitis, your GP may give you an antibiotic prescription to take to a pharmacy whenever you develop symptoms, without needing to see your doctor first. Your GP can also prescribe a low dose of antibiotics for you to take continuously over several months.

Read more about treating cystitis.

Preventing cystitis

If you get cystitis frequently, there are some things you can try that may stop it coming back. However, it's not clear how effective most of these measures are.

These measures include:

  • not using perfumed bubble bath, soap or talcum powder around your genitals – use plain, unperfumed varieties
  • having a shower, rather than a bath – this avoids exposing your genitals to the chemicals in your cleaning products for too long
  • going to the toilet as soon as you need to pee and always emptying your bladder fully
  • staying well hydrated – drinking plenty of fluids may help to stop bacteria multiplying in your bladder
  • always wiping your bottom from front to back when you go to the toilet
  • emptying your bladder as soon as possible after having sex
  • not using a diaphragm for contraception – you may wish to use another method of contraception instead
  • wearing underwear made from cotton, rather than synthetic material such as nylon, and not wearing tight jeans and trousers

Drinking cranberry juice has traditionally been recommended as a way of reducing your chances of getting cystitis. However, large studies have suggested it doesn't make a significant difference.

Interstitial cystitis

If you have long-term or frequent pelvic pain and problems peeing, you may have a condition called interstitial cystitis. This is a poorly understood bladder condition that mostly affects middle-aged women.  Unlike regular cystitis, there's no obvious infection in the bladder and antibiotics don't help. However, your doctor may be able to recommend a number of other treatments to reduce your symptoms.

Fever in children

High temperature is very common in young children. The temperature usually returns to normal within 3 or 4 days. A normal temperature in babies and children is about 36.4C, but this can vary slightly from child to child.  A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more. Fever is the body's natural response to fighting infections like coughs and colds.  Many things can cause a high temperature in children, from common childhood illnesses like chickenpox and tonsillitis, to vaccinations.

Your child might:

  • feel hotter than usual to the touch on their forehead, back or tummy
  • feel sweaty or clammy
  • have red cheeks

Use a digital thermometer (which you can buy from pharmacies and supermarkets) to take your child's temperature.

How to take your child's temperature

If your child's just had a bath or been wrapped tightly in a blanket, wait a few minutes then try again.

What to do if your child has a high temperature

You can usually look after your child or baby at home. The temperature should go down over 3 or 4 days.

Do

  • give them plenty of fluids
  • look out for signs of dehydration
  • give them food if they want it
  • check on your child regularly during the night
  • keep them at home
  • give them paracetamol or ibuprofen if they're distressed or unwell

Don't

  • undress your child or sponge them down to cool them – fever is a natural and healthy response to infection
  • cover them up in too many clothes or bedclothes
  • give aspirin to under 16s
  • combine ibuprofen and paracetamol, unless your GP tells you to
  • give paracetamol to a child under 2 months
  • give ibuprofen to a child under 3 months or under 5kg
  • give ibuprofen to children with asthma

Read more about giving medicines to children

Get an urgent GP appointment if your child:

  • is under 3 months old and has a temperature of 38C or higher, or you think they have a fever
  • is 3 to 6 months old and has a temperature of 39C or higher, or you think they have a fever
  • has other signs of illness, such as a rash, as well as a high temperature
  • has a high temperature that's lasted for more than 5 days
  • doesn't want to eat, or isn't their usual self and you're worried
  • has a high temperature that doesn't come down with paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • is showing signs of dehydration – such as nappies that aren't very wet, sunken eyes, and no tears when they're crying

Call NHS 111 at evenings and weekends

Knowing the signs of more serious illness

It's quite rare for fever to be a sign of anything serious (like meningitis, a urinary tract infection and sepsis).

Call 999 or go to A&E if your child:

  • has a fever you can't control
  • has a stiff neck
  • has a rash that doesn't fade when you press a glass against it
  • is bothered by light
  • has a fit (febrile seizure) for the first time (they can't stop shaking)
  • has unusually cold hands and feet
  • has pale, blotchy, blue or grey skin
  • has a weak, high-pitched cry that's not like their normal cry
  • is drowsy and hard to wake
  • finds it hard to breathe and sucks their stomach in under their ribs
  • has a soft spot on their head that curves outwards (bulging fontanelle)

Diarrhoea and vomiting are common in adults, children and babies. You can have them together or on their own. They're usually caused by a stomach bug and should pass in a few days. You can usually treat yourself or your child at home.

The most important thing is to have plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.

Do

  • stay at home and get plenty of rest
  • drink lots of fluids, such as water and squash – take small sips if you feel sick
  • carry on giving breast or bottle feeds to your baby – if they're being sick, try giving small feeds more often than usual
  • for babies on formula or solid foods, give small sips of water between feeds
  • eat when you feel able to – you don't need to have or avoid any specific foods
  • take paracetamol or ibuprofen if you're in discomfort – check the leaflet before giving them to your child

Don't

  • have fruit juice or fizzy drinks – they can make diarrhoea worse
  • make baby formula weaker – use it at its usual strength
  • give young children medicine to stop diarrhoea
  • give aspirin to children under 16

How long diarrhoea and vomiting last

In adults and children:

  • diarrhoea usually lasts 5 to 7 days
  • vomiting usually lasts 1 to 2 days

Diarrhoea and vomiting can spread easily

If you have a stomach bug, you could be infectious to others.

You're most infectious from when the symptoms start until 2 days after they've passed. Stay off school or work until the symptoms have stopped for 2 days.

To avoid spreading an infection:

Do

  • wash your hands with soap and water frequently
  • wash dirty clothing and bedding separately on a hot wash
  • clean toilet seats, flush handles, taps, surfaces and door handles every day

Don't

  • prepare food for other people, if possible
  • share towels, flannels, cutlery or utensils
  • use a swimming pool until 2 weeks after the symptoms stop

See how to wash your hands

A pharmacist can help if:

  • your baby is under 12 months old and has diarrhoea or vomiting
  • you or your child (over 12 months old) have signs of dehydration – such as dark, smelly pee or peeing less than usual
  • your child has more than 5 bouts of diarrhoea or vomits more than 3 times in 24 hours

They may recommend:

  • oral rehydration sachets that you mix with water and drink
  • medicine to stop diarrhoea for a few hours (like loperamide) – not suitable for young children

See a GP if you:

  • keep vomiting and are unable to keep fluid down
  • are still dehydrated despite using oral rehydration sachets
  • have bloody diarrhoea or bleeding from your bottom
  • have green or yellow vomit
  • have diarrhoea for more than 7 days or vomiting for more than 2 days

Take your child to the GP if they:

  • are under 12 months old and have signs of dehydration – such as fewer wet nappies
  • are under 3 months old and have a temperature of 38C or higher
  • are 3 to 6 months old and have a temperature of 39C or higher
  • keep vomiting and are unable to keep fluid down
  • have diarrhoea for more than 7 days or vomiting for more than 2 days

Check with the GP before going in. They may suggest a phone check-up.

Call 111 if you can't get an appointment.

Take your child to the GP urgently if they:

  • still have signs of dehydration despite using oral rehydration sachets
  • have green or yellow vomit
  • have blood in their poo or bleeding from their bottom

Go to A&E if you can't get hold of your GP.

Call 999 or go to A&E if you or your child:

  • are vomiting blood or have vomit that looks like ground coffee
  • have a stiff neck and pain when looking at bright lights
  • have a sudden, severe headache or stomach ache
  • may have swallowed something poisonous

What we mean by a severe headache or stomach ache

  • Severe pain:
    • always there and so bad it’s hard to think or talk
    • you can’t sleep
    • it’s very hard to move, get out of bed, go to the bathroom, wash or dress
  • Moderate pain:
  • always there
  • makes it hard to concentrate or sleep
  • you can manage to get up, wash or dress
  • comes and goes
  • is annoying but doesn’t stop you doing things like going to work
  • Mild pain:

Causes of diarrhoea and vomiting

You probably won't know exactly what the cause is, but the main causes of diarrhoea and vomiting are treated in the same way.

They're usually due to:

Other causes of diarrhoea

Other causes of vomiting

Burns and scalds are damage to the skin caused by heat. Both are treated in the same way.

A burn is caused by dry heat – by an iron or fire, for example. A scald is caused by something wet, such as hot water or steam.

Burns can be very painful and may cause:

  • red or peeling skin
  • blisters
  • swelling
  • white or charred skin

The amount of pain you feel isn't always related to how serious the burn is. Even a very serious burn may be relatively painless.

Treating burns and scalds

To treat a burn, follow the first aid advice below:

  • immediately get the person away from the heat source to stop the burning
  • cool the burn with cool or lukewarm running water for 20 minutes – don't use ice, iced water, or any creams or greasy substances such as butter
  • remove any clothing or jewellery that's near the burnt area of skin, including babies' nappies - but don't move anything that's stuck to the skin
  • make sure the person keeps warm – by using a blanket, for example, but take care not to rub it against the burnt area
  • cover the burn by placing a layer of cling film over it – a clean plastic bag could also be used for burns on your hand
  • use painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen to treat any pain
  • if the face or eyes are burnt, sit up as much as possible, rather than lying down - this helps to reduce swelling

Read more about treating burns and scalds.

When to get medical attention

Depending on how serious a burn is, it may be possible to treat it at home. For minor burns, keep the burn clean and don't burst any blisters that form.

More serious burns require professional medical attention. You should go to a hospital A&E department for:

  • all chemical and electrical burns
  • large or deep burns – any burn bigger than your hand
  • burns that cause white or charred skin – any size
  • burns on the face, hands, arms, feet, legs or genitals that cause blisters

If someone has breathed in smoke or fumes, they should also seek medical attention. Some symptoms may be delayed and can include:

  • coughing
  • a sore throat
  • difficulty breathing
  • facial burns

People at greater risk from the effects of burns, such as children under five years old and pregnant women, should also get medical attention after a burn or scald.

The size and depth of the burn will be assessed and the affected area cleaned before a dressing is applied. In severe cases, skin graft surgery may be recommended.

Read more about:

Types of burn

Burns are assessed by how seriously your skin is damaged and which layers of skin are affected. Your skin has three layers:

  • the epidermis – the outer layer of skin
  • the dermis – the layer of tissue just beneath, which contains blood capillaries, nerve endings, sweat glands and hair follicles
  • the subcutaneous fat, or subcutis – the deeper layer of fat and tissue

There are four main types of burn, which tend to have a different appearance and different symptoms:

  • superficial epidermal burn – where the epidermis is damaged; your skin will be red, slightly swollen and painful, but not blistered
  • superficial dermal burn – where the epidermis and part of the dermis are damaged; your skin will be pale pink and painful, and there may be small blisters
  • deep dermal or partial thickness burn – where the epidermis and the dermis are damaged: this type of burn makes your skin turn red and blotchy; your skin may be dry or moist, and become swollen and blistered, and it may be very painful or painless
  • full thickness burn – where all three layers of skin (the epidermis, dermis and subcutis) are damaged; the skin is often burnt away and the tissue underneath may appear pale or blackened, while the remaining skin will be dry and white, brown or black with no blisters, and the texture of the skin may also be leathery or waxy

Preventing burns and scalds

Many severe burns and scalds affect babies and young children. Examples of things you can do to help reduce the likelihood of your child having a serious accident at home include:

  • keeping your child out of the kitchen whenever possible
  • testing the temperature of bath water using your elbow before you put your baby or toddler in the bath
  • keeping matches, lighters and lit candles out of young children's sight and reach
  • keeping hot drinks well away from young children

Read more about preventing burns and scalds.

Sunburn is skin damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) rays.

The skin becomes red, warm, sore and tender. It may start to flake and peel after a few days, and will usually fully heal within 7 days. Sunburn is usually mild and short-lived, but it's important to try to avoid it because it can increase your risk of developing skin problems in later life, such as ageing (wrinkling) and skin cancer.

It can be easy to underestimate the strength of the sun when you're outside. The wind and getting wet, such as going in and out of the sea, may cool your skin, so you don't realise you're getting burnt. You should always be aware of the risk of sunburn if you're outside in strong sunshine, and look out for your skin getting hot.

What to do if you're sunburnt

If you or your child has sunburn, you should get out of the sun as soon as possible – head indoors or into a shady area. You can usually treat mild sunburn at home, although there are some circumstances where you should get medical advice.

To help relieve your symptoms until your skin heals:

  • cool you skin by having a cold bath or shower, sponging it with cold water, or holding a cold flannel to it
  • use lotions containing aloe vera to soothe and moisturise your skin
  • drink plenty of fluids to cool you down and prevent dehydration
  • take painkillers, such as ibuprofen or paracetamol, to relieve pain (but don't give aspirin to children under 16)

Try to avoid all sunlight, including through windows, by covering up the affected areas of skin until it's fully healed.

When to get medical advice

Contact your GP, go to your nearest NHS walk-in centre, or call NHS 111 if you feel unwell or you're concerned about your sunburn, particularly if you're burnt over a large area or have any of the more severe symptoms listed below.

You should also see your GP if a young child or baby has sunburn as their skin is particularly sensitive.

Signs of severe sunburn can include:

Special burn cream and burn dressings may be needed for severe sunburn. These are available from your GP or nurse at your GP surgery. Treatment in hospital may occasionally be needed.

Who's at risk of sunburn?

Everyone who's exposed to UV light is at risk of getting sunburn, but some people are more vulnerable than others.

You should take extra care when out in the sun if you:

  • have pale or white skin
  • have freckles or red or fair hair
  • tend to burn rather than tan
  • have many moles
  • have skin problems relating to a medical condition
  • are only exposed to intense sun occasionally – for example, while on holiday
  • are in a hot country where the sun is particularly intense
  • have a family history of skin cancer

Snow, sand, concrete and water can reflect the sun's rays on to your skin, and the sun is more intense at high altitudes.

Dangers of UV rays

Sunburn and sun allergy are short-term risks of sun exposure.

Longer-term risks over decades include:

Preventing sunburn

Protect your skin from strong sunlight by covering up with suitable clothing, finding shade, and applying sunscreen.

In the UK, the risk of getting sunburn is highest from March to October, particularly from 11am to 3pm, when the sun's rays are strongest. You can also burn in cloudy and cool conditions, and from sunlight reflecting off snow.

Suitable clothing

When out in the sun for long periods, you should wear:

  • a wide-brimmed hat that shades your face, neck and ears
  • a long-sleeved top
  • trousers or long skirts made from close-weave fabrics that don't allow sunlight through
  • sunglasses with wraparound lenses or wide arms with the CE Mark and European Standard EN 1836:2005

Sunscreen

When buying sunscreen, make sure it's suitable for your skin and blocks both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation.

The sunscreen label should have:

  • the letters "UVA" in a circular logo and at least 4-star UVA protection
  • a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 to protect against UVB

Most people don't apply enough sunscreen. Around 35ml (6-8 teaspoons) of sun lotion is needed to cover the body of an average-sized adult and achieve the stated SPF.

Watch this video about how to apply sunscreen.

If sunscreen is applied too thinly, it provides less protection. If you're worried you might not be applying enough SPF15, you could use a stronger SPF30 sunscreen. If you plan to be out in the sun long enough to risk burning, sunscreen needs to be applied twice:

  • 30 minutes before going out
  • just before you go out

Apply it to all areas of exposed skin, including your face, neck and ears. Also apply it to your head if you have thinning or no hair, but wearing a wide-brimmed hat is better.

The length of time it takes for skin to go red or burn varies from person to person. The Cancer Research UK website has a handy tool where you can find out your skin type to see when you might be at risk of burning.

You need to use water-resistant sunscreen if you're exercising and sweating or in contact with water.

Apply sunscreen liberally, frequently and according to the manufacturer's instructions. This includes straight after you've been in water (even if it's "water-resistant") and after towel drying, sweating, or when it may have rubbed off.

Advice for babies and children

Babies younger than 6 months should be kept out of direct sunlight.

During warm, sunny weather in the UK, children of all ages should:

  • cover up with long-sleeved shirts and long trousers or skirts
  • wear a wide-brimmed hat that covers the face, neck and ears
  • wear sunglasses that protect against UVA and UVB rays
  • use sunscreen (at least SPF15) and reapply it regularly throughout the day
  • spend time in the shade, such as under a tree or umbrella, or in a sun tent (particularly during the middle of the day)

Strains and Sprains

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/sprains-and-strains/

Back pain

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Back-pain/

Threadworms

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/threadworms/

Hay-Fever

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/hay-fever/

Insect Bites and stings

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/insect-bites-and-stings/

Chicken Pox

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chickenpox/

Measles

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/measles/

NHS Call 111NHS 111 Logo

NHS Call 111 is a 24-hour, confidential, nurse led, telephone service which provides health advice and reassurance if you feel unwell and are not sure what to do..
Call 111 when its less urgent than 999.

Further information on all aspects of health and healthcare can be found at www.nhs.uk where you can look up your symptoms, check many conditions and treatments.

Pharmacy

PharmacyPharmacists are experts in the use of medicines, who can offer free professional health advice without the need for an appointment, on the treatment of common health problems such as coughs and colds. They will also advise you if you need to see a doctor or nurse and can answer questions about prescribed and over-the-counter medicines. To find your local pharmacist, including details of opening hours, please visit: https://beta.nhs.uk/find-a-pharmacy/

GP Surgery

For the Doctors appointments you have the following options:-

  1.  You may book an appointment in advance, normally up to two weeks.
  2. A large percentage of our appointments can be booked on the day for conditions that need to be seen where a pre-booked appointment is not appropriate.

Appointments are also offered for a telephone consultation with your Doctor when a face to face consultation is not necessary i.e. reporting back on an ongoing condition where examination is not necessary, a query with medication, request for a sick note etc.

Where possible we will book you an appointment with your preferred GP at your registered site; If your problem is more urgent, this may not always be possible and you will be offered an appointment with one of the other GPs within the surgery.

When you call to make an appointment, a receptionist may ask you what’s wrong.  The receptionist is not being “nosey”, but actually ensuring that you see the most appropriate health professional for the most appropriate medical care, at the most appropriate time on the day.  This helps our health professionals prioritise house visits, phone calls and all patients.  Please help them to help you, when you book an appointment, to ensure that you will receive the best possible care on the day.  ALL Practice staff treat anything that you tell them in the strictest confidence and with the utmost respect.

Chaperones

Our Practice is committed to providing a safe, comfortable environment where patients and staff can be confident that best practice is being followed at all times and the safety of everyone is of paramount importance.

All patients are entitled to have a chaperone present for any consultation, examination or procedure where they feel one is required. This chaperone may be a family member or friend.

On occasions you may prefer a formal chaperone to be present. The Doctor or Nurse may also require a chaperone to be present for certain consultations in accordance with our chaperone policy.

If you wish to have a member of the Practice staff present during your consultation please mention this to our Reception Staff when booking your appointment, or to the doctor at your consultation, and it will be arranged.

Walk-in Centre

Norwich Practices’ Health and Walk In Centre, Rouen House, Rouen Road, Norwich, NR1 1RB.  Tel: 0300 0300 333.  Open 7 days a week, 7am-9pm.